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What Email Programs Are Your Readers Using? The Answer May Surprise You!

 

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This information provided by ISIPP SuretyMail Email Reputation Certification. The only email reputation and deliverability service with a money-back guarantee!

We’ve talked in the past about how important it is to be sure that your email renders well in many different email clients and devices, and also generally to be sure that your email is easy to read on mobile devices.

But have you ever wondered what the majority of your users are using to read their email?

A recent study by the folks over at Litmusapps has the answer, and the results may surprise you!

As you may have imagined, the majority of users are using Outlook. But, would you be surprised if I told you that of the 36% of people who are using Outlook, 29% of them are using a version of Outlook from 2003, or older!

And – and this will explain lots of the problems that lots of senders have – the close second, at 33% of users, is Hotmail! That’s right, 33% of users are reading their email using Hotmail.

A distant third is Yahoo!, with 14%, and here is how the rest break down:

Gmail: 6%
Apple Mail: 4%
Windows Live Mail (Desktop): 3%
Thunderbird: 2.4%
iPhone: 1.3%
Lotus Notes: .2%
AOL Mail: .1%

Unfortunately I’m late for a meeting, so I can’t expound on what you should learn from this, but I’d love to hear your comments!

Again, you can find out how your email looks in the top 20 email clients here.

And you can see the report here.

This information provided by ISIPP SuretyMail Email Certification. The only email reputation and deliverability service with a money-back guarantee!

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This article originally written on May 11, 2016, and is as relevant now as when it was first written.